Varanasi
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Shri kashi vishwanath temple varanasi uttar pradesh. Varanasi ganga aarti. Located, near Dashashwamedh ghat. It is customary for Varanasi temple, Hindu mythology. Varanasi is regarded as the spiritual capital of India. Hindu pilgrims who bathe in the Ganges River sacred waters and perform funeral rites, datings from the 11th century B.C, winding streets are some 2,000 temples, including the Kashi Vishwanath temple dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva. According to legend, Varanasi was founded by the god Shiva. There happened a fight between the two supreme gods, Brahma and Shiva and the succeeding combat resulted in one of the five heads of Brahma being torn off by Shiva. It was a custom of the time that the victor carried the slain adversary’s head in his hand and let it hang down from his hand as an act of ignominy and a sign of his own bravery.

Varanasi ganga Aarti

A bridle was also put into the mouth. Shiva thus dishonored Brahma’s head and kept it with him at all times. When he came to the city of Varanasi in this state, the hanging head of Brahma dropped from Shiva’s hand and disappeared in the ground. The land of Varanasi is therefore considered an extremely holy religious site. The Pandavas, the protagonists of the Hindu epic Mahabharata, are said to have visited the city in search of Shiva to atone for their sin of fratricide and Brāhmanahatya that they had committed during the climactic Kurukshetra War. It is regarded as one of seven holy cities (Sapta Puri) which can provide Moksha; Ayodhya, Mathura, Haridwar, Kashi, Kanchi, Avantika, and Dvārakā are the seven cities known as the givers of liberation. 2014 excavations found artefacts dating to 800 BCE and finds at Aktha and Ramnagar, two sites very near to Varanasi, show them to be from 1800 BCE, supporting the view that the Varanasi area was inhabited by this time. During the Mauryan era, Varanasi was connected by a road starting from Taxila and ending at Pataliputra. Chandradeva, founder of the Gahadavala dynasty made Banaras a second capital in 1090.

Varanasi Temple

Varanasi remained the center of activity for intellectuals and theologians during the Middle Ages, which further contributed to its reputation as a cultural center of religion and education. Several major figures of the Bhakti movement were born in Varanasi, including Kabir who was born here in 1389 and Ravidas, a 15th-century socio-religious reformer, mystic, poet, traveler, and spiritual figure, who was born and lived in the city and employed in the tannery industry. Numerous eminent scholars and preachers visited the city from across India and south Asia. Guru Nanak visited Varanasi for Maha Shivaratri in 1507, a trip that played a large role in the founding of Sikhism. Varanasi experienced a Hindu cultural revival in the 16th century under the Muslim Mughal emperor Akbar, who invested in the city and built two large temples dedicated to Shiva and Vishnu. The Raja of Pune established the Annapurna Mandir and the 200-metre (660 ft) Akbari Bridge was also completed during this period. The earliest tourists began arriving in the city during the 16th century. In 1665, the French traveler Jean-Baptiste Tavernier described the architectural beauty of the Vindu Madhava temple on the side of the Ganges. The road infrastructure was also improved during this period. It was extended from Kolkata to Peshawar by Emperor Sher Shah Suri; later during the British Raj it came to be known as the famous Grand Trunk Road.

Varanasi Ramakrishna Mission

Ramakrishna math varanasi address

Varanasi Ramakrishna Math, Uttar Pradesh 221010 India Phone: (0542) 245-1727(Off.); 245-1307; 245-1204 Email: varanasi@rkmM.org ; Website: www.VaranasiRkm.Org

Emperor Aurangzeb ordered the destruction of many temples in 1656 and the building of mosques, causing the city to experience a temporary setback. However after Aurangzeb’s death, most of India was ruled by a confederacy of pro-Hindu kings. Much of modern Varanasi was built during this time, especially during the 18th century by the Maratha and Bhumihar(Brahmin). The kings governing Varanasi continued to wield power and importance through much of the British Raj period including the Maharaja of Benares or Kashi Naresh. The Kingdom of Benares was given official status by the Mughals in 1737, and continued as a dynasty-governed area until Indian independence in 1947, during the reign of Dr. Vibhuti Narayan Singh. In the 18th century, Muhammad Shah ordered the construction of an observatory on the Ganges, attached to Man Mandir Ghat, designed to discover imperfections in the calendar in order to revise existing astronomical tables. Tourism in the city began to flourish in the 18th century. In 1791, under the rule of the British Governor-General Warren Hastings, Jonathan Duncan founded a Sanskrit College in Varanasi. In 1867, the establishment of the Varanasi Municipal Board led to significant improvements in the city’s infrastructure and basic amenities of health services, drinking water supply and sanitation.

Dashashwamedh Ghat

Author Mark Twain said of Varanasi in 1897, “Benares is older than history, older than tradition, older even than legend, and looks twice as old as all of them put together.” In 1910, the British made Varanasi a new Indian state, with Ramnagar as its capital, but with no jurisdiction over the city proper. The religious head, Kashi Naresh, has had his headquarters at the Ramnagar Fort since the 18th century, also a repository of the history of the kings of Varanasi, which is situated to the east of Varanasi, across the Ganges. The Kashi Naresh is deeply revered by the local people and the chief cultural patron; some devout inhabitants consider him to be the incarnation of Shiva. The British Army committed a massacre of Indian troops and city residence during the early stages of the Indian Rebellion of 1857. Annie Besant founded the Central Hindu College, which later became a foundation for the creation of Banaras Hindu University in 1916. Besant founded the Central Hindu College because she wanted to bring men of all religions together under the ideal of brotherhood in order to promote Indian cultural values and to remove ill-will among different sections of the Indian population.

Varanasi Kashi

Varanasi was ceded to the Union of India in 1947, and Dr. Vibhuti Narayan Singh incorporated his territories into the United Provinces in 1949. Varanasi experiences a humid subtropical climate with large variations between summer and winter temperatures. The dry summer starts in April and lasts until June, followed by the monsoon season from July to October. The temperature ranges between 22 and 46 °C (72 and 115 °F) in the summers. Winters in Varanasi see very large diurnal variations, with warm days and downright cold nights. Cold waves from the Himalayan region cause temperatures to dip across the city in the winter from December to February and temperatures below 5 °C (41 °F) are not uncommon. Being located in the Indo-Gangetic Plains of North India, the land is very fertile because low level floods in the Ganges continually replenish the soil. Varanasi is located between the Ganges confluences with two rivers: the Varuna and the Assi stream. The distance between the two confluences is around 2 miles (4 km), and serves as a sacred journeying route for Hindus, which culminates with a visit to a Sakshi Vinayak Temple.

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Amitava Ray

I'm a Photographer & Blogger. Born & raised in Kolkata, India. Me অমিতাভ রায়, from 1979 started Photography & Blogging since 2006👍