Independence Hall

The United States of America was founded at Independence Hall. Inside this structure, the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution were debated and signed.

Independence national historical park

The nation’s founding papers’ legacy of global values of freedom and democracy has impacted politicians all over the world, and Independence Hall has been designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1979.

The building’s construction began in 1732. Built to house all three elements of Pennsylvania’s colonial government, the edifice was previously known as the Pennsylvania State House.

The Pennsylvania legislators lent their Assembly Room to the Second Continental Congress and later the Constitutional Convention for meetings.

In 1775, George Washington was named Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army; in 1781, the Articles of Confederation were ratified, and in 1787, Benjamin Franklin sat in the “Rising Sun” chair.

In addition to the nation’s founding, there is a wealth of history to be discovered, ranging from “Georgian architecture” to “fugitive slave hearings.” Are you planning a trip? Find out more about the hours, tickets, and programmes available.

Independence hall history

Independence National Historical Park is a section of downtown Philadelphia that is partially owned by the city but managed by the National Park Service of the United States.

It spans 45 acres (18 hectares) and is home to a variety of historic landmarks connected to the American Revolution and the nation’s formation, including Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution were debated and signed.

The park was designated in 1948, and the National Park Service took over administration of the property in 1950. It was formally created in 1956.

The majority of the park is made up of an L-shaped strip of land that runs parallel to Independence Square, which is home to Independence Hall (UNESCO World Heritage site since 1979).

Inside independence hall

Congress Hall (where the United States Congress met from 1790 to 1800 when Philadelphia was the capital of the United States), and Philosophical Hall (where the United States Congress met from 1790 to 1800 when Philadelphia was the capital of the United States) (home of the American Philosophical Society, founded by Benjamin Franklin).

To the north of the square is Independence Mall, which houses Old City Hall, which served as the home of the United States Supreme Court until 1800; and the Liberty Bell Center, which houses the iconic bell.

The Second Bank of the United States (now a portrait gallery), Carpenters’ Hall (meeting place of the First Continental Congress), and the First Bank of the United States (operated 1797–1811) are among the buildings east of the plaza.

Benjamin Franklin’s residence previously stood on Franklin Court, close to the northeast of the square. The park also has some additional buildings from the colonial period that are spread across the city.

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