Statue of Liberty

The Statue of Liberty is on Liberty Island at the entrance to New York Harbor in the U.S. bay of Upper New York. Since 1984, the Statue of Liberty has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The Statue of Liberty is on Liberty Island at the entrance to New York Harbor in the U.S. bay of Upper New York. Since 1984, the Statue of Liberty has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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The Statue of Liberty, which is also called “Liberty Enlightening the World,” is a huge statue that shows how the people of the United States and France got along. Including the pedestal, the monument is 93 meters (305 feet) tall.

Statue of Liberty Facts and History

It shows a woman with her right hand up, holding a torch, and her left hand down, holding a tablet with the date July 4, 1776, written on it. The torch is 29 feet (8.8 meters) long from the flame to the bottom of the handle.

How tall is the Statue of Liberty

Inside the arm is a 42-foot (12.8-meter) service ladder that gives access. From 1886 to 1916, anyone could climb this path. The observation deck on top of the pedestal can be reached by an elevator. The crown of the figure has an observation platform that can be reached by stairs or a spiral staircase.

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A French historian named Édouard de Laboulaye came up with the idea for the statue in 1865. People in France gave money, and in 1875, work began in France under the direction of sculptor Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi.

Copper sheets were hammered by hand into the shape of the statue, which was then put together on four huge steel supports. The Liberty Statue was made by Eugène-Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc and Alexandre-Gustave Eiffel.

Where is Statue of Liberty

On July 4, 1884, in Paris, the colossus was given to Levi Morton, who was the American minister to France. Levi Morton worked his way up until he was vice president. In 1885, the statue was taken apart and moved to New York City.

It was 46 meters (151’1″) tall and weighed 225 tonnes. Later, when the pedestal was done, it was put inside Fort Wood on Bedloe’s Island. It was designed by Richard Morris Hunt, an American architect.

On October 28, 1886, President Grover Cleveland gave the statue, which was set up on a pedestal, its official name. Over the years, the torch has gone through many changes. In 1916, it was changed to use electricity, and in the mid-1980s, it was redone with repoussé copper that had gold leaf on it.

In July 1986, American and French workers fixed and cleaned up the statue so it would be ready for a party celebrating its 100th anniversary. At first, the statue was in charge of the US Lighthouse Board, because people thought the lit torch would help people find their way.

Fort Wood was still being used by the Army in 1901, so the War Department took over care of the statue and made sure it was taken care of. It was made a national monument in 1924, and the National Park Service took care of it starting in 1933.

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When Fort Wood was taken out of service in 1937, the whole island was added to the monument. In 1956, Bedloe’s Island became Liberty Island, and in 1965, Ellis Island got a new name.

Interesting Facts about the Statue of Liberty

The country’s main immigration station was added to the monument’s land, making it about 58 acres in size (24 hectares). There are displays about the history of the Statue of Liberty, including the original torch from 1886. They were kept at the base of the statue until 2018, when they were moved to the nearby Statue of Liberty Museum.

When was the Statue of Liberty Built

The Statue of Liberty was built in France between 1875 and 1884. It was taken apart in 1885 and moved to New York City. Even though the torch has been changed or rebuilt several times since it was put up, the statue on Liberty Island was put back together in 1886.

What does the Statue of Liberty Represent?

The Statue of Liberty is a 305-foot (93-meter) statue on Liberty Island in Upper New York Bay, just off the coast of New York City. A woman is shown in the statue as the personification of freedom. She holds a torch in her raised right hand and a tablet in her left hand.

What is the Significance of the Statue of Liberty?

The Statue of Liberty is one of the most well-known sculptures in the world, and it is often seen as a symbol of both New York City and the United States. The statue is also close to Ellis Island, where millions of people came to the United States until 1943. So, the Statue of Liberty is associated with the ideas of hope, liberty, and justice.

What does the Statue of Liberty have in her hands?

The torch is held up by the right hand of the Statue of Liberty. This is the light that shows other people the way to freedom. She has a tablet in her left hand that says “JULY IV MDCCLXXVI.” in Roman numerals. This is the date that the Declaration of Independence was signed.

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Statue of Liberty Designer

The French sculptor Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi made the Statue of Liberty between 1875 and 1884. He started drawing sketches for it in 1870. Bartholdi and his team hammered about 31 tons of copper sheets onto a steel frame. Before it was put on its current pedestal, the statue was over 151 feet (46 meters) tall and weighed 225 tonnes.

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Statue of Liberty Poem

The poem “The New Colossus” by Emma Lazarus, which was written in 1883, is written on a plaque near the pedestal’s entrance. It says that the song was written to help raise money for the pedestal.

Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
“Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!” cries she
With silent lips. “Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”